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ABORTION / MISCARRIAGE
DISPROPORTIONATELY BY SMOKERS

"As early as 1902 Ballantyne had found an increase in the abortion rate in French and Austrian women working in tobacco factories.”—Beulah R. Bewley, “Smoking in Pregnancy,” British Medical Journal (Vol 288, Issue #6415) pp 424-426 (11 Feb 1984).

About "fifty-three per cent. of . . . abortions . . . are due to tobacco. . . . inhalation of [second-hand] tobacco smoke by pregnant mothers when sitting among smokers is sufficient to cause fatal poisoning of the fœtus."—Herbert H. Tidswell, M.D., The Tobacco Habit: Its History and Pathology (London: J. & A. Churchill, 1912), p 238.

Wherefore, says Dr. Tidswell, tobacco, including second-hand smoke, has a record of significantly leading to abortion, p 184, terminating about 1/7 of live-births, p 177.

"The smoking mother is . . . 80 percent more likely than the nonsmoker to have a spontaneous abortion."—Samuel S. Epstein, M.D., The Politics of Cancer (San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1978), p 162.

There is a "growing body of evidence that abortion is linked with increased rates of substance abuse among women," says Priscilla K. Coleman, Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Bowling Green State University, "Induced Abortion and Increased Risk of Substance Abuse: A Review of the Evidence," 1 Current Women's Health Reviews 21-34 (2005).

"There is also a higher chance for a still birth," says Louis Neipris, M.D., " Secondhand smoke: a danger during and after pregnancy" (19 May 2010). "Exposure to secondhand smoke can lead to the loss of the baby at any time during the pregnancy." "Secondhand smoke can actually affect your ability to start a healthy pregnancy. A group of cells called the corpus luteum secretes hormones to help the uterus (womb) prepare for implantation of the fertilized egg. Toxins from secondhand smoke interfere with this hormone secretion. As a result, the uterus may not be as ready to accept a fertilized egg. Or the fertilized egg could implant in the uterus, but not root itself, leading to an early miscarriage."

"Nonsmoking pregnant women exposed to ETS may be at increased risk of spontaneous abortion. Given the high prevalence of ETS exposure, the public health consequences of passive smoking regarding early fetal loss may be substantial," say Lena George, Fredrik Granath, Anna L. V. Johansson, Goran Anneren, and Sven Cnattingius, "Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion," 17 Epidemiology (Issue # 4), 10 July 2006.

Daniel Mackay, Scott Nelson, Sally Haw and Jill Pell, "Effect of the Scottish smokefree law on complications of pregnancy" (March 2012) (small for gestational age, preterm delivery and spontaneous preterm labor), cite a 5-12% drop in these conditions for women who got pregnant beginning shortly before the law took effect. This study demonstrates that there are large and clinically meaningful benefits of smokefree laws in terms of health, and that the real economic effect of smokefree laws is to substantially reduce medical costs.

Smoking bans also reduce the risk of abortions. See for example, Bianca Cox, PhD student1, Evelyne Martens, Benoit Nemery, Jaco Vangronsveld and Tim S. Nawrot, "Study links smoking bans to fewer pre-term births" (British Medical Journal, BMJ 2013; 346:f441, 14 February 2013).


This site reveals the secret about the tobacco connection to abortion. The goal is to assist you in your decisions, by providing you educational information based on medical data and studies citing the role of cigarettes in inducing abortion.

"An abortion is termed 'induced' to differentiate it from a spontaneous abortion in which the products of conception are lost naturally (also called a miscarriage)," says the explanatory material at the "Surgery Encylopedia" article entitled "Abortion, induced." Tobacco induced abortions are toxics-caused, meaning not "natural."

"No reasonable doubt now remains that smoking in pregnancy has adverse effects on the developing fetus. The effects range from retardation of fetal growth [birth defects], and prematurity, and to an increased risk of perinatal death from all causes . . . . This view is supported by a report of an increased incidence of spontaneous abortion [aka miscarriage] among smokers.”—“Smoking Hazard to the Fetus," British Medical Journal (Vol 1, Issue #5850) pp 369-370 (17 Feb 1973).

It is known that “in female smokers menstrual disturbances are frequent and that abortion occurs often among female cigar makers.”—Dr. John H. Kellogg, Tobaccoism, or, How Tobacco Kills (Battle Creek, Michigan: The Modern Medicine Publishing Co, 1922), p 123.

From the unborn's point of view, he or she is being killed, whether the term is 'abortion' or 'miscarriage.'

Even before, in the 1880's, concern was being expressed about the tobacco link to infant deaths, by Dr. Hippolyte Adéon Dépierris (1810-1889), in La Tabac et la Famille: Il Cause la Rareté et la Stérilite des Mariages, la Débilité Native et la Mortalité des Enfants, la Dépopulation des Pays (Paris: E. Dentu, 1881), an abbreviated version of his more detailed 1876 work.

"Dr. Herbert Tidswell of England, F. R. C. S., in observing a large number of families of smokers and nonsmokers, found that abortions were more common among the wives of smokers than among the wives of nonsmokers, even where the wives did not smoke."—Daniel H. Kress, M.D., The Cigarette As A Physician Sees It (Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press Pub Ass'n, 1931), p 35.

See also

Since then, of course, many more studies on the total subject of tobacco, abortion, and infant death, have been made. Here is a partial list, after which an overview follows, then a call to action.

Simpson, WJ, "A Preliminary Report on Cigarette Smoking and The Incidence of Prematurity," 73 Am J Obstet Gynecol 818-815 (1957)

Herriot, A, Billewicz, WZ, and Hytten, FE, "Cigarette Smoking in Pregnancy," 1 Lancet 771-773 (1962)

Jarvinen, PA, and Osterlund, K, "Effect of Smoking During Pregnancy on The Fetus, Placenta, and Delivery," 9 Ann Paediatr Fenn 18-26 (1963)

Yerushalmy, J, "Mother's Cigarette Smoking and Survival of Infant," 88 Am J Obstet Gynecol 505-518 (1964)

Ravenholt, RT, Levinski, MJ, Nellist, DJ, and Takenga, M, "Effects of Smoking Upon Reproduction," 96 Am J Obstet Gynecol 267-281 (1966)

Comstock, GW and Lundin, FE, "Parental Smoking and Perinatal Mortality," 98 Am J Obstet Gynecol 708-718 (1967)

Butler, NR, Goldstein, H, and Ross, EM, "Cigarette Smoking in Pregnancy: Its Influence on Birth Weight and Perinatal Mortality," 2 Brit Med J 127-130 (1972)

Kline J., Z. A. Stein, M. Susser, and D. Warburton, "Smoking: A Risk Factor for Spontaneous Abortion," 297 New Engl J Med (# 15) 793-796 (13 Oct 1977) (concluding "that smoking during pregnancy is a risk factor for spontaneous abortion")

Himmelberger DF, Brown BW, Cohen EN. "Cigarette Smoking During Pregnancy and The Occurrence of Spontaneous Abortion and Congenital Abnormality," 108 Am J Epidemiol 470-479 (1978)

Harlap, S, and Shiono, PH, "Alcohol, Smoking and Incidence of Spontaneous Abortions in the First and Second Trimester," 1 Lancet 173-176 (1980)

Hemminki K, Mutanen P, Saloniemi I, "Smoking and the Occurrence of Congenital Malformations and Spontaneous Abortions: Multivariate Analysis." 145 Am J Obstet Gynecol 61-66 (1983)

Nelson, KB and Ellenberg, JH, "Predictors of Low and Very Low Birth Weight and The Relation of These to Cerebral Palsy," 254 J Am Med Ass'n 1473-1479 (1985)

Anokute, C, "Epidemiology of Spontaneous Abortions: The Effects of Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking," 78 J Nat'l Med Ass'n 771-775 (1986)

Sandahl B. "Smoking Habits and Spontaneous Abortion." 31 Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 23-31 (1989)

Armstrong BG, McDonald AD, and Sloan M, "Cigarette, Alcohol, and Coffee Consumption and Spontaneous Abortion," 82 Am J Public Health 85-87 (1992)

Windham GC, Swan SH, Fenster L, "Parental Cigarette Smoking and The Risk of Spontaneous Abortion," 135 Am J Epidemiol (#12) 1394-1403 (1992)

Suraiya, M., et al., "Cigarette Smoking as a Risk Factor for Ectopic Pregnancy," 178 Am J Obstetrics & Gynecology 493-498 (1998) (smoking 1-5 cigarettes per day causes 1.6 times more likely to have ectopic pregnancy; smoking over 20 cigarettes per day, 3.5 times more likely; a dose-response relationship)

Ness, R., Grisso, J., Hirschinger, N., Markovic, N., Shaw, L., Day, N., and Kline, J. (1999), "Cocaine and Tobacco Use and the Risk of Spontaneous Abortion," 340 New England J. Med. 333-339 (1999)

Oncken, C., Kranzler, H., O'Malley, P., Gendreau, P., Campbell, W. A., "The Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Fetal Heart Rate Characteristics," 99 Obstet Gynecol 751-755 (2002)

Venners, S.A., X. Wang, C. Chen, L. Wang, D. Chen, W. Guang, A. Huang, L. Ryan, J. O'Connor, B. Lasley, J. Overstreet, A. Wilcox, and X. Xu, "Paternal Smoking and Pregnancy Loss: A Prospective Study Using a Biomarker of Pregnancy 159 Am J Epidemiol (#10) 993-1001 (15 May 2004) (saying "that heavy paternal smoking increased the risk of early pregnancy loss through maternal and/or paternal exposure.")

Dr. Haibin Wang, et al., in an article in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (August 2006), cite chemicals causing embryos to fail due to a "swamping" effect. Commentary by Prof. Emeritus Herbert Schuel, Univ of N Y at Buffalo, in vol. 116, pp 2087 - 2090, said, "The most significant aspect of the study is what it says about the normal reproductive process and how they are regulated by . . . the signaling system." "The take-home message would be, if . . . you are smoking either marijuana or tobacco cigarettes, stop. The same kinds of effects . . . are produced by nicotine and tobacco smokers." Reference Curtis L. Taylor, Newsday, "Marijuana use linked to infertility in women," The Detroit News (25 August 2006), p 12A.


Don't forget the introduction: "The smoking mother is . . . 80 percent more likely than the nonsmoker to have a spontaneous abortion."—Samuel S. Epstein, M.D., The Politics of Cancer (San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1978), p 162.

NonsmokersSmokers
100180

Abortion occurs significantly more among smokers than nonsmokers. Here is background data on why that is so:
"Over 37 million people (one of every six Americans alive today) will die from cigarette smoking years before they otherwise would." See the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), book, Research on Smoking Behavior, Research Monograph 17, Publication ADM 78-581, p v (December 1977).

A few years earlier, the Royal College of Physicians of London, in its book Smoking and Health Now (London: Pitman Medical and Scientific Publishing Co, 1971), p 9, had already declared the smoking-caused death toll a "holocaust" due to the then "annual death toll of some 27,500." If 27,500 deaths is a "holocaust" -- and it is -- 37 million is (in contrast to the Nazi 6 million holocaust), a six fold+ holocaust. That is above the World War II "crimes against humanity" level for which prosecutions occurred in The Nurnberg Trial, 6 FRD 69 (1946).

An increased abortion rate is one of the many manifestations and effects of the overall tobacco holocaust.

"No evils are so manifestly visited upon the third and fourth generations as the evils which spring from the use of tobacco."—Sir Benjamin C. Brodie (1783-1862). He was Surgeon to British King George IV, William IV, and Queen Victoria. A comparable modern position is U.S. Surgeon General.

Dr. Brodie served under the British royal dynasty, the House of Hanover. The prior dynasty had been the House of Stuart. Its first English monarch had been James I, who had been anti-tobacco, and had published a book, the Counterblast, on tobacco-caused diseases in 1604. When Dr. Brodie wrote, England had a new dynasty, the Hanover dynasty.

What had happened to the Stuart dynasty? Answer: The last Stuart monarch had been a snuffer. That was Queen Anne (1665-1714, reigned, 1702-1714). Anne was a snuff-user. ALL her children died.

  • 1684-1688, 4 miscarriages, 2 dead within hours of birth
  • William, born 24 July 1689, died 29 July 1700 (age 11)
  • 1689-1696, 6 miscarriages, 2 dead within hours of birth
  • Since snuffer Anne was clearly not leaving a surviving heir to the throne, Britain became concerned as to who would be her successor. In 1701, Britain passed a law, a succession act, to transfer the dynasty to the House of Hanover, so as to ensure a successor! Thus ended the House of Stuart. The dynasty change led to the current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II (1952-____).

    The father of Elizabeth II was George VI. In the pre-viagra era, he was impotent from smoking, so had her, and sister Margaret, by "artificial insemination." He later died from a smoking-caused heart attack. See Kitty Kelley, The Royals (New York: Warner Books, 1997), pp 23-24, 85-86, and 98.

    For background deaths, tragedies, and adverse events in the life of the family of George Bush (President, Jan 1989 - Jan 1993), normally linked to tobacco, see Kitty Kelley, The Family: The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty (New York: Doubleday, 2004):
  • mother Barbara was a smoker, her "hair turned white, she ground her teeth at night, and she smoked two packs of cigarettes a day," (pp 93, 102, 137, 191)
  • mother Barbara had two miscarriages (pp 102 and 137)
  • In 1976, Bush's "wife, Barbara, was dealing with a serious depression that more than once led her to the brink of suicide. His nephew Prescott S. Bush III was fighting schizophrenia; his uncle James Smith Bush, who had embezzled funds and fled the country, was dying in the Philippines; and George's son George W. Bush, who by his own admission was 'drinking and carousing and fumbling around,' was arrested that summer for driving under the influence [of alcohol]" (p 350)
  • "Both [George and Barbara Bush] had been exposed to the ravages of alcoholism . . . each had an alcoholic uncle named Jim whose marital breakups caused their families no end of grief and consternation. Even Barbara's most illustrious relative, her fourth cousin four times removed, Franklin Pierce, the fourteenth President of the United States (1853-57), was an alcoholic. The insidious disease . . . had already wrapped its tenacles around the roots of both family trees" (p 69)
  • George W. Bush admits "youthful mistakes," his "sister-in-law Sharon Bush alleged that [he] had snorted cocaine 'not once . . . but many times'" (p 266)
  • George W. Bush's hazing of fellow students included to "brand' its [fraternity] pledges. 'It's only a cigarette burn,' George W. said. 'There's no scarring mark physically or mentally'" (p 237)
  • His brother "Eleven-year-old Neil had been diagnosed with dyslexia in the second grade, and Barbara knew he needed special education" (p 230)
  • Wife Laura says that at Southern Methodist University, "people smoked cigarettes—and I did" (p 357)
  • Grandfather Preston Bush "was battling the ravages of pipe smoking and binge drinking, [and was] plagued with a racking cough that . . . was diagnosed as lung cancer" (p 290)
  • young sister Robin developed leukemia and died (pp 129, 135).
  • According to the President of the American Council on Science and Health, Elizabeth M. Whelan, Sc.D., "Cigarette Makers Get Away With Murder," The Detroit News, p 4B (14 March 1993). Since America believes that murdering tens of millions of smokers is ok, it is no surprise that that attitude has spread.

    Once it was ok for the tobacco lobby to kill members of the current generation whom we can see, the next step (called "transferred intent") became easier—killing members of the next generation whom we cannot see.

    The tobacco lobby is involved in the killings known as abortion. Cigarettes contain toxic chemicals, which in turn cause abulia, the key underlying factor in abortion. This adverse double action (toxic chemicals + abulia) makes cigarettes a risk factor in abortion.

    There is a cigarette link to promiscuity, pregnancy, SIDS, AIDS, and abortion. See the Department of Health and Human Services book, Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People: A Report of the Surgeon General (1994). Its key analysis is that

    “Tobacco use in adolescence is associated with a range of health-compromising behaviors including being involved in fights, carrying weapons, engaging in higher-risk sexual behavior . . .”

    Similar data was cited a century earlier, for example, in
  • Dr. William A. Alcott's 1836 book citing the tobacco-immorality connection as "obvious",

  • Dr. Herbert H. Tidswell's similar 1912 reference,

  • 1889 by Rev. John B. Wight's tobacco-exposé book citing an 1881 Surgeon General Report; and

  • in 1915, in a book citing data by Dr. G. F. Butler:
  • "In my work at the Detention Hospital, I find that licentiousness resulting in venereal disease and alcoholism, is the principal cause of mental derangement. And one of the most pernicious incentives to improper indulgences is the excessive use of tobacco.

    "Any agent which weakens the heart and so excites the brain as to make it impossible to concentrate the mind on one subject, as tobacco does in many cases, followed by failing memory, incontinuity of thought, nervous excitement with physical and sexual debility, and muscular tremors, is dangerous beyond all estimate, particularly for young people."—Quoted from Botany Prof. Bruce Fink's book, Tobacco, p 25 (1915).

    "Dr. Betha van Hoosen of Chicago has included tobacco along with alcohol as a mainstay of commercial prostitution; and a teacher writes [pursuant to addiction-abulia effects' interaction], in the Voice of the People, that our soldiers in Germany 'can seduce many girls or married women for a handful of cigarettes!'"—Prof. Pryns Hopkins, Ph.D. (1885-1970), Gone Up in Smoke: An Analysis of Tobaccoism (Culver City, CA: The Highland Press, 1948), p 158.

    See also tobacco-related profanity data and AIDS-homosexuality-tobacco connection data.

    Cigarettes, when lit, emit deleterious emissions, e.g., carbon monoxide, 42,000 ppm, even though it is unsafe above around 100 ppm. See the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (DHEW) book, Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service, PHS Pub 1103, Table 4, p 60 (1964).

    "Carbon monoxide is a dangerous substance. The molecule binds more strongly to the hemoglobin in the blood than does oxygen. A person breathing air that contains even a small percentage (one part in 250) of carbon monoxide may die of suffocation."—Gordon P. Johnson, Bonnie B. Barr, and Michael D. Leyden, Physical Science (New York: Addison-Wesly Pub Co, Inc, 1988), pp 298-299. 1/250 = 40,000 ppm; cigarette smoke contains more than that (42,000 ppm).

    Such facts depict the basis underlying abortion. So doctors have long (since at least 1881) been looking into the subject of smoking and fetal death, including the cigarettes-abortion link, e.g., in studies such as the above-listed ones.

    The role of cigarettes in abortion has been cited by DiFranza, JR and Lew, RA, "Effect of Maternal Cigarette Smoking on Pregnancy Complications and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," in 40 J Family Practice (#4) 385-394 (April 1995). (Full text may be obtainable via your local library reference service INFOTRAC). DiFranza and Lew also provide an extensive bibliography.

    The study's "result" is a finding that:
    "Each year, use of tobacco products is responsible for an estimated 19,000 to 141,000 tobacco-induced abortions, 32,000 to 61,000 infants born with low birthweight, and 14,000 to 26,000 infants who require admission to neonatal intensive care units . . . an estimated 1900 to 4800 infant deaths resulting from perinatal disorders, and 1200 to 2200 deaths from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)."

    The study's "conclusion" is that
    "Tobacco use is an important preventable cause of abortions, low birthweight, and deaths from perinatal disorders and SIDS. All pregnant women should be advised that smoking places their unborn children in danger. . . . The cigarette . . . injures or kills a sizable proportion of its users when used as intended by the manufacturer. The harm caused by the cigarette is not limited to the user, however, as unborn children and infants are . . . harmed by other people's use of tobacco."

    Cigarettes are linked scientifically to abortion not only because of their toxic chemicals, but also because those chemicals alter, impair, the mother's brain function. Specifically, those chemicals cause abulia (impaired ethical and impulse controls).

    Smoking is so notoriously linked to abortion, so taken for granted, so much a matter of common knowledge, that it is depicted in the movie, “Cabaret" (1972). Note Scene 28 (DVD version), wherein the promiscuous smoker has an abortion on a "whim." Such "whim" illustrates the typical smoker brain damage condition called "abulia," impaired ethical and impulse controls.

    Such large numbers of foreseeable deaths are
    "natural and probable consequences" thus
    "intended by the manufacturer" as our webpage
    on lawbook definitions of such terms shows,
    thus making this a criminal law matter.

    "Most smokers do not view themselves at increased risk of heart disease or cancer." John P. Ayanian, M.D., M.P.P., Paul J. Cleary, Ph.D., "Perceived Risks of Heart Disease and Cancer Among Cigarette Smokers," 281 J Am Med Ass'n (#11) 1019-1021 (17 March 1999). Wherefore, as smokers do not perceive these basic dangers to themselves, they definitely do not realize the danger that smoking poses to nonsmokers in other ways such as this. Wherefore nonsmokers'—children and adults—only advance protection is enforcement of pertinent cigarette control laws, including prosecution of the pushers on murder charges pursuant to the transferred intent doctrine.


    To protect all of us, seek prosecution for the deaths of smokers and other nonsmokers killed by cigarettes. After-the-fact prosecution of the killer(s) is too little, too late for those already deceased, but it can serve to protect you and your family.

    Avoid the error exposed in the Luke 10:30-37 Parable of the Good Samaritan. The help-refusers' priority was to focus only on their issue, thus they refused to deal with another issue that transpired. A priority that refuses to deal with other issues thus violates one of the top two commandments, 'love thy neighbor' (Matthew 22:37-40) thus becomes a Matthew 7:21 matter.

    Providing money damages to survivors of some smokers killed by cigarettes, while essential and better than nothing, is erratic in the judicial system, and does not vindicate the laws against intentional poisonings and killings, does not fully protect YOU or your family. To protect all of us, it is essential that your area prosecutors be caused to enforce the laws against poisoning and murder.

    In showing the foreseeable abortion deaths from cigarettes, remember, the DiFranza-Lew study is only one of many. Multiple other studies have shown more such facts. But theirs is current and its conclusions are written in lay-friendly terms. Dr. DiFranza has elsewhere made clear his desire to stop the deaths.

    Cigarette smoking causes far more deaths than the DiFranza-Lew study cites. The issue of the massive killings of smokers, with resultant large scale killings of nonsmokers (via lung cancer, drunk driving, SIDS, crime, etc.) has been shown abundantly by other studies. The DiFranza-Lew study emphasized deaths beyond what other studies typically cite.

    Underlying the tobacco pusher killing of smokers, is the fact of the adverse effect of cigarettes' toxic chemicals on the body, particularly the brain. The effect is "abulia," impaired reasoning and ethical controls, foreseeably leading from the killings of smokers, to nonsmokers as well. Sin spreads. Christians used to be more active in opposing the sin of cigarette selling. Resuming this old belief and activism is essential to ending the abortion portion of the overall tobacco "holocaust."

    The abulia effect occurs due to cigarettes' deleterious ingredients. This fact is so well-established in medicine that an appellate court took judicial notice of the fact, in the case of Banzhaf v F.C.C., 132 US App DC 14, 29; 405 F2d 1082, 1097 (1968) cert den 396 US 842 (1969). For details, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking: 25 Years of Progress: a Report of the Surgeon General, Publication CDC 89-8411, Table 7, pp 86-87 (1989), lists examples of deleterious ingredients including but not limited to:

    acetaldehyde (1.4+ mg)arsenic (500+ ng)benzo(a)pyrene (.1+ ng)
    cadmium (1,300+ ng)crotonaldehyde (.2+ µg)chromium (1,000+ ng)
    ethylcarbamate 310+ ng)formaldehyde (1.6+ µg)hydrazine (14+ ng)
    lead (8+ µg)nickel (2,000+ ng)radioactive polonium (.2+ Pci)

    The 1989 Surgeon General Report, supra, Table 6, p 83, lists nicotine as at "1,000-3000 µg/cigarette." Nicotine is "a colorless, oily, water-soluble, highly toxic, liquid alkaloid, found in tobacco and valued as an insecticide," The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2d ed (unabridged), p 1298.

    In fact, cigarettes' deleteriousness is so great that judicial notice of the fact was taken as long ago as pursuant to an 1897 Tennessee cigarette-ban law, in Austin v State, 101 Tenn 563; 566-7; 48 SW 305, 306; 70 Am St Rep 703 (1898) affirmed 179 US 343 (1900). Tennessee's law was adequate.

    A really thorough cigarette effects prevention law was passed by Iowa (1897).

    Michigan soon thereafter (1909) passed a law banning unsafe cigarettes, law number MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216.

    Due to cigarettes' deleterious nature and ingredients, they, when lit, emit deleterious emissions, which smokers inhale. Toxic chemicals then, unfortunately, are transported by the blood to the brain. The Department of Health, Education and Welfare (DHEW), Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service, PHS Pub 1103, Table 4, p 60 (1964), lists examples of deleterious emissions (contrasted to the chemicals' "speed limits" (official term, "Threshold Limit Value," TLV) set by safety rule 29 CFR § 1910.1000) including but not limited to:

    Chemical
    Quantity
    "Speed Limit"/TLV
    acetaldehyde 3,200 ppm 200.0 ppm
    acrolein 150 ppm 0.5 ppm
    ammonia 300 ppm 150.0 ppm
    carbon monoxide 42,000 ppm 100.0 ppm
    formaldehyde 30 ppm 5.0 ppm
    hydrogen cyanide 1,600 ppm 10.0 ppm
    hydrogen sulfide 40 ppm 20.0 ppm
    methyl chloride 1,200 ppm 100.0 ppm
    nitrogen dioxide 250 ppm 5.0 ppm
    "The blood of cigarette smokers will contain from 2 to 10 percent carboxyhemoglobin . . . initial symptoms of poisoning . . . will result from exposures to 1,000 ppm for 30 minutes or 500 ppm for one hour. One hour at 1500 ppm is dangerous to life. Short exposures (one hour) should not exceed 400 ppm. See Julian B. Olishifski, P.E., C.S.P., Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 2d ed (National Safety Council), pp 1039-1040.

    The hazard to, and adverse effects on, smokers (need it be said?) arises as their exposure is above these criteria. The emissions thus violate the long-standing right to pure air. In 1909, during the administration of three-term activist Governor Fred Warner, the Michigan legislature passed a law forbidding manufacture, giveaway, and sale of deleterious and adulterated cigarettes. (As with any other product, safe ones are allowed. The idea of the safe cigarettes law is to halt the fact that smokers are discriminated against by being the only people regularly sold a known deleterious ingredient. Other deleterious products are taken off the market as soon as deleteriousness is known. Smokers are thus the only group denied the benefit of standard product protection law.)

    The Michigan safe cigarettes law, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, in essence, an abortion prevention act, bans
    "any person within the state [from action that] manufactures, sells or gives to anyone, any cigarette containing any ingredient deleterious to health or foreign to tobacco . . . ."

    Some people want to blame the modern era for abortion, or the Supreme Court and Roe v Wade, 314 F Supp 1217 (ND Texas, 1970) remanded 410 US 113; 93 S Ct 705; 35 L Ed 2d 147 (22 Jan 1973) for promoting an attitude of death. No, that is way too short sighted. The attitude of death was being set up long before that.

    For example, by 1836, it was already well-established "that thousands and tens of thousands die of diseases of the lungs generally brought on by tobacco smoking. . . . How is it possible to be otherwise? Tobacco is a poison. A man will die of an infusion of tobacco as of a shot through the head." —Samuel Green, New England Almanack and Farmer's Friend (1836). But did people care? or try to stop the killing of smokers?

    Eighty-seven conditions were identified as tobacco-linked, by Dr. Joel Shew, Tobacco: Its History, Nature and Effects on the Body and Mind (Stoke, England: G. Turner Pub Co, 1849). But did people try to stop the killing of smokers?

    Cancer of the lip was found to be 100% tobacco-correlated in a study by French Dr. Bouisson (1859). Did people try to stop this?

    Three published court cases, Carver v State, 69 Ind 61; 35 Am Rep 205 (1879), Mueller v State, 76 Ind 310; 40 Am Rep 245 (1881), and State v Ohmer, 34 Mo App 115 (1889) recognized that tobacco delivers a dangerous drug, nicotine. But did the public care to stop the Tobacco Holocaust?

    The Michigan House of Representatives recognized that cigarettes are deleterious to youths as cited by the 1889 Michigan House Committee on the subject. But did they then ban cigarettes?

    Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) members sent Congress in 1892 thousands of petitions for banning cigarettes, citing the already then-known fact that cigarettes were "causing insanity and death to thousands" of youths. But Congress, meaning, the people, paid no heed.

    Criminal law action and prosecution is necessary as private litigation is ineffective. See for example, the case of McSorley v Philip Morris, Inc, 170 App Div 2d 440; 565 NYS2d 537 (4 Feb 1991) app dism 77 NY2d 990; 571 NYS2d 915; 575 NE2d 401 (9 May 1991) (allegation of practice of failure to warn of foreseeable tobacco-caused harm (blindness, deafness, and mental retardation) to unborn fetus) and the analysis by Novello, "Health Hazards of Cigarette Use," Trial (March 1992), p 46. Litigation is too late to prevent the harm to the individual. Only prior-existing law can PREVENT such harm.

    The Tennessee Legislature and Supreme Court deemed cigarettes deleterious to smokers themselves, Austin v State, 101 Tenn 563; 48 SW 305 (1898), affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court at 179 US 343, 21 S Ct 132; 45 L Ed 224 (1900). But after winning, Tennessee then repealed its law, and is now a vehemently pro-tobacco state!

    An Experiment on Rat Mothers:
    A Vivid Parallel for Human Smoker Mothers
    "Essenberg, Schwind, and Patras (1940) of Loyola University studied the effects of nicotine and cigarette smoke on pregnant rats and their offspring. Some of the rats were placed in a jar and subjected to the smoke from about one-third of a cigarette. This is the equivalent of a human being smoking about one package of cigarettes a day. The rats were exposed to this smoke three minutes each day for a period of weeks. Other rats were daily injected with one-half to one cubic centimeter of a solution containing 1:1000 or 1:2000 parts of chemically pure nicotine.
    "Two-thirds of the young from mother rats treated in this way were underweight at birth and continued so throughout life; many died in infancy. The experimenters observed numerous cases of temporary sterility, resorption of young before birth, and abortion among the "smoked" and injected mothers. Frequently the treated mothers showed faulty maternal behavior, which ranged all the way from neglecting to feed their young to eating them. This did not happen to the normally kept rats.
    "The experimenters found that the "smoking" of virgin rats also had marked effects on the size and mortality rate of the young produced by them later after they 'quit smoking.' They say that many of their observations on rats are like those made on women who smoke much or who are engaged in [jobs in] the tobacco industries."—Essenberg, J. M., Justin U. Schwind, and Anne R. Patras—"The Effects of Nicotine and Cigarette Smoke on Pregnant Female Albino Rats and Their Offsprings," 25 Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 708 (1940), cited in Prof. Arthur H. Steinhaus and Florence M. Grunderman, Tobacco and Health: Some Facts About Smoking (2nd ed) (New York: Association Press, 1941), pp 42-43.

    Some people observe that the Roe v Wade decision brought about by smoker Norma Roe, was a natural outgrowth of the right-wing, conservative, anti-big government attitude, combined with the pro-choice-on-tobacco movement.

    Being pro-choice on tobacco naturally led to being pro-choice on tobacco effects and links, including abortion.

    Here is a chart showing how the Roe v Wade vote was:

    The Seven Roe v Wade Votes
    By Appointing President:
    The More Republican Conservative
    The More Anti-Big Government
    Keeping It Out of The Bedroom
    NIXON 3 EISENHOWER 2ROOSEVELT 1JOHNSON 1
    Burger
    Brennan
    Douglas
    Marshall
    Blackmun
    Stewart
    Powell

    The media has a record of suppressing this type of data. TCPG's related sites provide more information citing other aspects of the Tobacco Holocaust, of which abortion is one tiny sub-part. Abortion used to be a crime. This was before Roe v Wade, 410 US 113 (1973), and in some cases, still is. TCPG's prevent crime website describes the people who do that--commit crimes--typically the same people who do the abortions. The people who do abortion, are typically the same people who kill nonsmokers with lung cancer, and whose children die of SIDS. Abortion is part of the total tobacco-manufacturer genocide problem, as each incident thereof constitutes murder.

    Saying the above in other words, and with an example to make the medical facts clearer, we can put the above data this way. A woman who is having a child out-of-wedlock, what can we conclude about her? That she consented at the initial stage? ____________. Now factor in this: she had been drugged with the rape drug. Now what is your answer? ___________. You see, the answer changes with the data. Here is the connection: tobacco functions in a mind-altering way -- abulia-causing -- like the rape drug. Indeed, nicotine can be, with poetic license, called "the original rape drug." In this context, therefore, we see a way to deal with abortions--by dealing with the typical underlying abulic factor in it--cigarettes.

    The literature shows that it is typically persons 12 years old who begin to smoke. These persons are below the age of "choice"  ("consent" is the legal term). They were not provided data on known effects of smoking, by an method meeting the legal criteria/definition for choice/"consent." Wherefore, abortion by smokers does not involve "choice/consent." Allegations of "choice/consent" constitute a scam/consumer fraud contrary to actual definitions of law. See lawbook definitions.

    To prevent abortion, i.e., the underlying factor in it, we cannot succeed alone. We need to revive the old coalition that brought more success--a coalition with groups with other parallel interests. Together, sharing this common interest, we can defend the unborn by the same type method as others do against the other elements in tobacco-pusher-caused deaths. It was that old coalition that got the prevention law passed, which bans the underlying factor in the lifestyle of death, cigarettes.

    Of course, Gov. Fred Warner, under whom the prevention act was passed, is long gone. Three-term Michigan Governor, John Engler (1991-2002), and his staff were paper supportive of action to enforce that law, issuing five pertinent memoranda:
    Exec Order 1992-3 Law Support Letter # 1 Anti-Cigarette Smuggling Finding Law Support Letter # 2 Governor's Overview

    The problem is that Michigan Gov. Engler and staff did nothing to initiate real ENFORCEMENT of the law--and will continue to do nothing, unless and until they are repeatedly written letters seeking enforcement--action vs mere paper support.

    Tobacco smoke also causes forced abortions, second-hand-smoke-caused involuntary abortions. This is particularly true on the job. The "inhalation of tobacco smoke by pregnant mothers when sitting among smokers is sufficient to cause fatal poisoning of the fœtus."—Herbert H. Tidswell, M.D., The Tobacco Habit, supra, p 238. Thus tobacco, including second-hand smoke, has a record of significantly leading to abortion, p 184, terminating about 1/7 of live-births, p 177. An activist group, Action on Smoking and Health, is litigating to force the federal government to protect against that, and other tobacco evils, on the job. The U.S. Department of Labor, Attorney General John Ashcroft, and Pres. George Bush are fighting aginst the litigation. They want smokers to be allowed to cause forced abortions of non-smoker women. In public, of course, they pretend to be anti-abortion.

    The Need To Keep Writing to Politicians for Action
    Lest They Compromise: An Historical Example
    Though President Abraham Lincoln eventually freed slaves,
    continued abolitionist pressure helped. In the 1 Dec 1862
    "State of the Union" Address, he had offered the South a deal,
    the government would pay for the slaves, if slaves were freed
    by the year 1900!! -- 37 years in the future.   Reference
    The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Vol V (1861-1862),
    Roy Basler, ed. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers Univ Press, 1953)
    'Message to Congress, 1 Dec 1862,' pp 518-537, esp. p 530.
    From http://medicolegal.tripod.com/abolitionists.htm, para 28.
    Abolitionists helped stop the deal: a mere 13 months later,
    1 Jan 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation was law!
    We modern abolitionists must also keep the pressure on.
    Changing defeat into VICTORY may be only months away!!

    The Emancipation Proclamation circumvented the Supreme Court's pro-slavery decisions, and thus helped get rid of slavery, by invoking a legal point it had missed (the obscure war power clause)! The approach here is like that. We too invoke a legal point that court decisions have missed (the obscure MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216 ban of the underlying abulic factor in the lifestyle of death -- cigarettes, the No. 1 killer). By invoking this law against the underlying factor, we circumvent (moot) the court decisions, undermine the abulic lifestyle of death across the board, thus reduce abortion along with other lifestyle of death aspects.

    1998 Thank You Letter to Edmund Cardinal Szoka For His Anti-Smoking Activities
    See also John Hooper, “Attack on Smoking Gets Papal Blessing” (The Guardian, 31 December 2004), citing an article by Fr. Giuseppe De Rosa, “È Severamente Vietato Fumare,” in IV Civilta Cattolica (#3707) 491-500 (4 December 2004).

    An Abortion Breast-Cancer Information Site

    THE ONLY RELIGIOUS LEADER CITING
    THE TOBACCO ROLE IN ABORTION

    Patrick Mahoney - Christian Defense Coalition

             When we (a century ago) had a broad-based coalition, with this common interest (regardless of other differences), we did succeed, as our ancestors / predecessors did in 1909. The 1909 prevention act was due to a wide range of coalition groups supporting it, due to cigarettes' other adverse effects. Each group had its own interest—which may not even agree with each others!—except in the one aspect. (Now so-called religious leaders aid and abet the tobacco holocaust, even while "professing" to be anti-abortion, by regularly supporting pro-tobacco politicians, knowingly undermining the cause they "profess," clearly an "evil influence.")

              Viewed as a whole, the prevention law has the side benefit of potentially eliminating other cigarette adverse consequences as well, effects detailed at other sections of this website. TCPG is thus enlisting the support of all the varied groups. To help prevent abortion, we seek/need to revive the old coalition, thereby secure support from varied interest groups, including those whose concern focuses on some other cigarette effect.


    Helping Keep Ourself Accurate Lest We Be Tripped Up:
    Three Recent Articles on Breast Cancer-Abortion Link
    Note the Dates - What The Last Two Say
    Link - Yes (19 Oct 96)Link - No (16 Nov 96)Link - No (18 Jan 97)

             More information on the subject is at a site entitled, Abortion - Breast Cancer Link.

             Additionally, a 15 May 1994 American Cancer Society study written by Eugenia E. Calle, Ph.D., et al., in the American Journal of Epidemiology,

    "reports that a woman's risk of dying from breast cancer increases by 25% if the woman is a smoker -- and rises in proportion to the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the total number of years smoked, culminating with a 75% increased risk in women who smoke two packs per day or more."

             A prior study by her and colleagues found the following: "The association of current smoking with fatal breast cancer risk increased with increasing numbers of cigarettes per day and with total number of years smoked. . . . the risk of fatal breast cancer was significantly associated with current smoking at baseline, number of cigarettes per day, years smoked, and age at initiation . . . ." See Eugenia E. Calle, Heidi L. Miracle-McMahill, Michael J. Thun, and Clark W. Heath, Jr., "Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Fatal Breast Cancer," 139 Am J Epidemiology (10) 1001-1007 (1994).

    Clearly, the significant fact of smoking as a factor in breast cancer is one to not overlook.

             If this information is new to you, be aware of the rampant pro-tobacco media censorship. The media's wide-spread censorship of tobacco-facts, to the extreme of printing of gross disinformation, has been cited since at least 1930, by

  • Charles M. Fillmore, The Tobacco Taboo (Indianapolis: Meigs Pub Co, 1930), pp 88-89

  • Dr. Lennox Johnston, "Cure of Tobacco-Smoking," 263 The Lancet 480, 482 (6 Sep 1952)

  • George Seldes, Never Tire of Protesting, (New York: Lyle Stuart Inc, 1968), Chapters 7-10, pp 61-99. (Seldes founded www.infact.org).
  •          When rarely (as normally "the press has suppressed or withheld the facts concerning tobacco toxicity from the American people"), something is published, the material often goes unread as the tobacco taboo goes to the extreme of widespread refusal

    "even to read any book or article which refers to the harmfulness of tobacco . . . or in any other way exposes the evils of the drug."—Frank L. Wood, M.D., What You Should Know About Tobacco (Wichita, KS: The Wichita Publishing Co, 1944), pp 33 and 63.
    Our tobacco taboo website opposing pro-tobacco censorship has more details.

    Scam Alert
    The tobacco lobby knows this information. It has infilitrated many so-called "right-to-life" groups so as to arrange that they endorse pro-tobacco candidates for office. Such candidates "talk" against abortion, but by voting and working FOR tobacco, intentionally obstruct, sabotage, and undermine the cause.
    Be alert. Help your RTL leadership. Aid them to avoid undermining the cause in this way, by endorsing pro-tobacco candidates.
    A candidate who 'talks' for abortion, but fights tobacco, is far preferable. In addition, tobacco is the No. 1 cause of premature death, making an anti-tobacco position the best guage of a genuine 'pro-life' view.

              What this site is asking is your help in (a) getting the Michigan safe cigarettes law enforced, and (b) getting all other governments to pass the same law in their areas. Please help us save lives, prevent premature deaths, by preventing unsafe cigarettes and their role in abortion.

             To fight this problem, here are four sample letters. Sample "A" is to Governor Rick Snyder asking him to have the State Police enforce the law. Sample "B" is to Attorney General William Schuette asking him to take "cease and desist" action to enforce the law. Each has the authority to help. As both the Governor and Attorney General are lawyers, the letters are written in "legalese." Sample letter "C" is to the State Police Director asking for the law to be enforced. Sample letter "D" is different, and is for you to send where the government still ignores the cigarette-abortion link. It is to be sent, for example, to the President, Congress, other Governors, and state legislators.

    * * * Sample Letter A * * *

    Honorable Rick Snyder
    Governor, State of Michigan
    P. O. Box 30013
    Lansing MI 48909-7513                   [By Fax to (517) 335-6863]

    Dear Governor Snyder:

             This is a request that, to help prevent one of the risk factors in abortion--cigarette use, you assign the Michigan State Police to enforce the cigarette control law, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216.

              Cigarettes are a risk factor in abortion, as shown in a recent study by Joseph R. DiFranza and Robert A. Lew, "Effect of Maternal Cigarette on Pregnancy Complications and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," in 40 Journal of Family Practice 385-394 (1995). That study found that "Each year, use of tobacco products is responsible for an estimated 19,000 to 141,000 tobacco-induced abortions . . . . . Tobacco use is an important preventable cause of abortions."

               Cigarettes are not only the overall No. 1 cause of premature death, they also have a role in abortion. The cigarette-abortion link occurs because of cigarettes' numerous toxic chemicals. The safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, bans unsafe cigarettes. It forbids "any person within the state" from action that "manufactures, sells or gives to anyone, any cigarette containing any ingredient deleterious to health or foreign to tobacco . . . ." Please, as an abortion prevention measure, assign the Michigan State Police to enforce it, and aid county sheriffs and local police departments to do likewise.

             All cigarettes are deleterious, their label admits they are, and most if not all are adulterated with additives. MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, puts personal responsibility on those with most knowledge of the contraband substance (manufacturers and sellers), not on unwary consumers, often children.

             State Police enforcement action is a normal action that they do in other state-wide law violation situations. There are precedents as well. Austin v State, 101 Tenn 563; 48 SW 305; 70 Am St Rep 703 (1898) aff'd 179 US 343 (1898); Shimp v N J Bell Tele Co, 145 N J Super 516; 368 A2d 408 (1976); Commonwealth v Hughes, 468 Pa 502; 364 A2d 306 (1976); and Smith v Western Elec Co, 643 SW2d 10, 13 (Mo App, 1982).

             As a matter of preventing abortion, the Michigan safe cigarettes law needs to be enforced. Please help. The law against this deleterious and adulterated product needs to be enforced. Please assign the State Police to protect abulic smokers, children, and nonsmokers, by enforcing the safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216. Please have them halt the rampant violations, and interdict deleterious and adulterated cigarettes.

    Respectfully,

    * * * Sample Letter B * * *

    Honorable William Schuette
    Attorney General, State of Michigan
    P. O. Box 30213
    Lansing MI 48909

    Dear Attorney General Schuette:

             This is a request that, to help prevent one of the risk factors in abortion--cigarette use, you take "cease and desist" action to stop violations of the safe cigarettes law, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216.

              Cigarettes are a risk factor in abortion, as shown in a recent study by Joseph R. DiFranza and Robert A. Lew, "Effect of Maternal Cigarette on Pregnancy Complications and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," in 40 Journal of Family Practice 385-394 (1995). That study found that "Each year, use of tobacco products is responsible for an estimated 19,000 to 141,000 tobacco-induced abortions . . . . . Tobacco use is an important preventable cause of abortions."

               Cigarettes are not only the overall No. 1 cause of premature death, they also have a role in abortion. The cigarette-abortion link occurs because of cigarettes' numerous toxic chemicals. The safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, bans unsafe cigarettes. It forbids "any person within the state" from action that "manufactures, sells or gives to anyone, any cigarette containing any ingredient deleterious to health or foreign to tobacco . . . ." Please, as an abortion prevention measure, take "cease and desist" action to stop the rampant violations of the law. "Cease and desist" action is an action you take in other state-wide law violation cases. Please, as an abortion prevention measure, do that in this situation.

             All cigarettes are deleterious, their label admits they are, and most if not all are adulterated with additives. MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, puts personal responsibility on those with most knowledge of the contraband substance (manufacturers and sellers), not on unwary consumers, often children.

             "Cease and desist" action is a normal action that you do in other state-wide law violation situations. There are precedents, for example, Austin v State, 101 Tenn 563; 48 SW 305; 70 Am St Rep 703 (1898) aff'd 179 US 343 (1898); Shimp v N J Bell Tele Co, 145 N J Super 516; 368 A2d 408 (1976); Commonwealth v Hughes, 468 Pa 502; 364 A2d 306 (1976); and Smith v Western Elec Co, 643 SW2d 10, 13 (Mo App, 1982).

             As a matter of preventing abortion, the Michigan safe cigarettes law needs to be enforced. Please help. The law against this deleterious and adulterated product needs to be enforced. Please take "cease and desist" action to protect abulic smokers, children, and nonsmokers, by enforcing the safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216. Please take "cease and desist" action to halt the rampant violations.

    Respectfully,

    * * * Sample Letter C * * *

    Col. Kristie Etue, Director
    Department of State Police
    714 South Harrison Road
    East Lansing MI 48823

    Dear Col. Etue:

             This is a request that, to help prevent one of the risk factors in abortion--cigarette use, you assign officers to enforce the safe cigarettes law, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216.

              Cigarettes are a risk factor in abortion, as shown in a recent study by Joseph R. DiFranza and Robert A. Lew, "Effect of Maternal Cigarette on Pregnancy Complications and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," in 40 Journal of Family Practice 385-394 (1995). That study found that "Each year, use of tobacco products is responsible for an estimated 19,000 to 141,000 tobacco-induced abortions . . . . . Tobacco use is an important preventable cause of abortions."

               Cigarettes are not only the overall No. 1 cause of premature death, they also have a role in abortion. The cigarette-abortion link occurs because of cigarettes' numerous toxic chemicals. The safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, bans unsafe cigarettes. It forbids "any person within the state" from action that "manufactures, sells or gives to anyone, any cigarette containing any ingredient deleterious to health or foreign to tobacco . . . ." Please, as an abortion prevention measure, work with the Governor, Attorney General, and/or prosecutors; assign officers to enforce the law; and aid county sheriffs and local police departments to do likewise.

             All cigarettes are deleterious, their label admits they are, and most if not all are adulterated with additives. MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, puts personal responsibility on those with most knowledge of the contraband substance (manufacturers and sellers), not on unwary consumers, often children.

             State Police enforcement action is a normal action that officers do in other state-wide law violation situations. There are precedents as well. Austin v State, 101 Tenn 563; 48 SW 305; 70 Am St Rep 703 (1898) aff'd 179 US 343 (1898); Shimp v N J Bell Tele Co, 145 N J Super 516; 368 A2d 408 (1976); Commonwealth v Hughes, 468 Pa 502; 364 A2d 306 (1976); and Smith v Western Elec Co, 643 SW2d 10, 13 (Mo App, 1982).

             As a matter of preventing abortion, the Michigan safe cigarettes law needs to be enforced. Please help. The law against this deleterious and adulterated product needs to be enforced. Please assign officers to protect abulic smokers, children, and nonsmokers, by enforcing the safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216. Please have them halt the rampant violations, and interdict deleterious and adulterated cigarettes.

    Respectfully,

    * * * Sample Letter D * * *

    President Barack H. ObamaU.S. Senator _______U.S. Representative __Governor ___ State Senator __State Representative __
    1600 Pennsylvania AvenueSenate Office BuildingHouse Office BuildingState CapitolState CapitolState Capitol
    Washington DC 20500Washington DC 20510Washington DC 20515City State ZipCity State ZipCity State Zip

             This is a request that you take action to get a law passed that will serve as an abortion prevention law. Michigan already has such a law. It is law number MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216. It deals with the cigarette link to abortion.

              Cigarettes are a risk factor in abortion, as shown in a recent study by Joseph R. DiFranza and Robert A. Lew, "Effect of Maternal Cigarette on Pregnancy Complications and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," in 40 Journal of Family Practice 385-394 (1995). That study found that "Each year, use of tobacco products is responsible for an estimated 19,000 to 141,000 tobacco-induced abortions . . . . . Tobacco use is an important preventable cause of abortions."

               Cigarettes are not only the overall No. 1 cause of premature death, they also have a role in abortion. The cigarette-abortion link occurs because of cigarettes numerous toxic chemicals. The Michigan safe cigarettes act, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, bans unsafe cigarettes. Please, as an abortion prevention measure, get a copy of that law, which in essence forbids "any person within the state [from action that] manufactures, sells or gives to anyone, any cigarette containing any ingredient deleterious to health or foreign to tobacco . . . ."

             All cigarettes are deleterious, their label admits they are, and most if not all are adulterated with additives. MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, puts personal responsibility on those with most knowledge of the contraband substance (manufacturers and sellers), not on unwary consumers, often children. Michigan's well-written abortion prevention act deals with one of the risk factors in abortion, unsafe cigarettes, and bans them. We need the same law for the protection and benefit of everyone. Smokers should not be discriminated against by being the only people regularly sold a deleterious product. Other deleterious products are recalled and taken off the market.

             As a matter of preventing abortion, everyone needs you to take action to get a safe cigarettes act passed. Please take action to copy the Michigan safe cigarettes law, MCL § 750.27, MSA § 28.216, so all of us can benefit from its wise prevention-oriented approach.

    Respectfully,

    * * * * *


    All bills on abortion, should have an amendment offered, banning cigarette manufacture, as per the tobacco-abortion-connection. Such amendment should use the text of either the Michigan, or Iowa, law.

    Please re-type, add recipient addresses where unlisted,
    add your name and return address, sign, and mail the above letters.
    The person you save may be yourself or your friend.
    If you wish, you can use different wording.

    * * * * *

    RELATED SITES
    Crime
    Definitions
    Genocide
    Michigan Law
    Murder Precedents
    Toxic Chemicals

    FOR FURTHER READING
    "News - Most abortion deaths are in developing world," 318 Brit Med J (#7197) 1505 (1999) Mills, J L, “Cocaine, Smoking, and Spontaneous Abortion,” 340 N Engl J Med (#5) 380 (1999)
    Mendola, P; Moysich, KB; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, PG; Schisterman, EF; Graham, S; Vena, JE; Marshall, JR; Ambrosone, CB, “Risk of Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion, Cigarette Smoking, and Genetic Polymorphisms in NAT2 and GSTM1,” 9 Epidemiology (# 6) 666 (1998) Chatenoud, L; Parazzini, F; Cintio, ED; Zanconato, G; Benzi, G; Bortolus, R; Vecchia, CL, “ORIGINAL REPORTS - Paternal and Maternal Smoking Habits before Conception and During the First Trimester: Relation to Spontaneous Abortion,” 8 Annals of Epidemiology (#8) 520 (1998)
    Kline, J; Levin, B; Kinney, A; Stein, Z, “Cigarette Smoking and Spontaneous Abortion of Known Karyotype: Precise Data But Uncertain Inferences” 141 Am J Epidemiology (# 5) 417 (1995) "Abortion Surveillance: Preliminary Data—United States, 1992," 273 J Am Med Ass'n (#5) 369 (1 Feb 1995)
    James Heffernan, "What Does 'Pro-Life' Really Mean?" (15 August 2007) Leviticus 17:11, 14 (life in the blood);
    Genesis 2:7 (breath)

    See also Louis J. Palmer, Jr., Encyclopedia of Abortion in the United States (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2002). It contains statistical data such as abortion rates. It has a by-state entry on each state, and repoduces the text of each state's law on abortion. It has maps of "States with Statutes that Ban Human Cloning (101)," "States with Feticide Statutes" (114), "States with Statutes Requiring Informed Consent Before Abortion (166)," and "States That Impose Criminal Sanctions for Injury to a Pregnant Woman That Harms Fetus" (167).

    Voluntary abortion (as distinct from tobacco-smoke-caused abortions) used to be generally legal, before the Civil War. Then came change, making abortion more so a crime. See also this history site.

    Graphic Credit
    Skull of a Skeleton with Burning Cigarette

    Vincent van Gogh, 1885-1886

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